Consider Smart Choices rather than Smart Toys this Christmas

christmas giftsHave you finished your Christmas shopping yet or are there still some people left on your nice list?!?

With only 8 shopping days left, SRxA’s Word on Health wants to help you make smart gift choices for the little people in your life.   Bridget Boyd, MD, a pediatric safety expert at Loyola University Health System offers up the following tips to ensure you bring joy, not tragedy, on Christmas morning.

Christmas is a wonderful time of year, but it can quickly turn tragic if we’re not careful,” says Boyd. “Sometimes in our attempts to make Christmas extra special for our kids and grandkids, safety can get lost in the mix.”

Shopping for infants and toddlers can be difficult since many toys are labeled appropriate for ages 3 and up. Though it may limit the options, Boyd said following age-appropriate guidelines is important for keeping kids safe.

baby with toy in mouthAge labels are monitored closely and should be taken seriously. Choking and strangulation hazards can mean life or death to a child,” said Boyd. “Most people do follow the guideline to avoid small parts that might be choking hazards, but there are some safety tips that aren’t as obvious.”

She suggests when opening gifts to watch out for ribbons that could be a strangulation hazard and to try to keep older children’s gifts away from younger children so there is not accidental ingestion of a small part. Toys with strings are a choking hazard as well, especially those that are greater than 12 inches in length.

If a child is under the age of 2, they are more than likely going to put whatever they are given in their mouth, so avoid items with paint, chemicals or small parts,” Boyd said. Small magnets and button batteries are some of the most hazardous. Magnets should be kept away from small children as they cause severe damage or even death if ingested.

button batteries webButton batteries are extremely dangerous so try to avoid gifts that include them. They also can be found in musical greeting cards, hearing aids and remote controls so make sure to keep an eye on your child around those items,” Boyd said. “Go to the emergency room immediately if a child has placed a button batter into their body. This includes swallowing as well as shoving up the nose or in the ear.”

Still, gift-giving safety isn’t just about swallowing hazards, it’s also thinking about the entire well-being of a child. “When thinking about what gift to give, try to find something that encourages children to use their imagination and get up and get moving,” says Boyd.

baby with cell phoneThe American Academy of Pediatrics recommends children spend no more than two hours in front a screen a day. This includes video games, computers, phones and TVs. “So many young kids want cell phones, but is that really the best gift to give a child? Think about what is age-appropriate. There will be plenty of time to give phones and videos games in the future.”

And if you do give an electronic gift, supervision is key, especially if it involves the Internet.

Unfortunately, cyber predators and cyberbullying are becoming more common and pose a very real risk to children. If your child does receive a computer for Christmas, make sure you supervise their Internet use. The best place for a computer is in the family room.  There should be no screens, including computers, TVs or phones in a child or adolescent’s room. Screen time can interfere with sleep as well as distract them from participating in healthier activities for body and mind.

Whatever gifts you decide to give this holiday season, It’s also a good idea to periodically check consumer websites such as recall.gov and saferproducts.gov to ensure gifts are safe and have not been recalled.

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Healthy Trends for Digital Health

health info on ipadDoctors and patients are increasingly tapping, zooming, and clicking in a flurry of connectivity.  According to Fred Pennic author of HIT Consultant’s Mind Blowing HIT Stats and Trends:

  • 85% of US Physicians own or use any smartphone professionally
  • 62% of US physicians own a tablet
  • 81% of physicians own an iPad
  • 50% of tablet owning physicians have used their device at the point of care
  • 39% of US physicians communicate online with patients via email, secure messaging, instant messaging, or online video conferencing
  • Two-thirds of physicians use online video to learn and keep up to date with clinical information
  • 88% of physicians would like patients to be able to track or monitor their health at home

Physicians spend an average of 11 hours online for professional purposes per week. And those with three screens (tablets, smartphones, and desktops/laptops) spend more time online on each device and go online more often during the workday than physicians with one or two screens.

wireless doctorsIn addition to communicating with patients, most doctors say they wish they could wirelessly access electronic medical records, prescribe, monitor both in- and out-patients and track patient referrals.

And it’s not just doctors. Patients and consumers are at it too!  Health related Google searches are up 47% from last year, and:

  • 20% of patients would like to monitor their fitness & wellbeing
  • 18% would like to allow a physician to remotely monitor a condition
  • 80% of Internet users look online for health information
  • 20% search for health related content on mobile devices
  • 23% use social media to follow health experiences of friends

Even more mind-blowing…in 2012 consumers were willing to spend $14 Billion on digital health products. This included $700 Million on mobile health applications, $4 Billion on health related video games and $8.9 Billion on resources rating doctors & hospitals.

No word from Fred on how much of their health information people are getting from blogs such as Word on Health. But with thousands of views each day, and increase in readership of >100% versus 2011, we certainly seem to be part of this upwards digital healthcare trend.

Where do you get your healthcare information? We’d love to hear from you.

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Drug Reps Set to Become Slaves to Their iPads

In recent weeks SRxA’s Word on Health has run a number of stories about iPads.  For the record, we don’t have shares in Apple, nor do we even have iPads, though we’re keeping our fingers crossed that Father Christmas might bring us one this year.   This latest iPad related post is particularly interesting as it could potentially change the pharmaceutical industry forever.

Last week, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) sales reps were handed a lesson in “be careful what you wish for.”  If they win their ongoing U.S. Supreme Court appeal over overtime pay, their employers may well make them slaves to their iPads by introducing factory worker style rules for clocking in and out.

For our readers unfamiliar with the case, hundreds of GSK ’s pharmaceutical sales reps signed on to a class action lawsuit demanding overtime pay. The suit  was filed in 2006 by lead plaintiff Anthony Coultrip, who worked for GSK between 2003 and 2005 and hinges on a counter-intuitive definition of what a sales rep actually is. Under federal labor law, salespersons who earn commissions are exempt from protections requiring overtime pay for extra hours worked. Drug reps, however, don’t actually “sell” drugs – they merely promote them and the sale occurs later at the pharmacy. The GSK reps argue that makes them “promotion workers” whose work is so routine that they ought to get overtime.

Anyway…back to the story. If the Supreme Court rules in favor of Mr Coultrip and his colleagues, and institutes overtime pay, life for the nation’s 90,000 drug reps could change dramatically.  Instead of the relative independence and limited accountability that they enjoy today, the life of a pharma sales rep could become a nightmare  of check-ins, surveillance, time-sheets and electronic monitoring.

Hardly surprising given that a huge sum of money is at stake here.  Since the litigation began, at least 19 pharmaceutical companies have been sued by sales reps demanding overtime pay.

To try to minimize overtime payment liability, industry analysts predict that clocking in and out of work via an iPad will soon become the most important act of a rep’s day. Failure to clock in and out may result in loss of pay for that period of time.  Repeatedly “forgetting to clock in or out” may result in disciplinary action including the possibility of termination.

Taking this to extremes, industry insiders predict a scenario in which:

  • Reps will be GPS tracked to verify time and location for all work related time during the work day.
  • The same tracking will also be used to verify mileage for business versus personal use of the company car.
  • Any rep planning to take more than two hours of personal time during a workday may have to get prior approval for a vacation day.
  • Drug reps work will not be allowed to work more than 8 hours per day or more than 40 hours per week without prior written approval from their manager.
  • If reps receive emergency customer calls, outside of their work day hours, they will have to adjust subsequent work time so as not to exceed the 40 hours per week maximum.
  • They will be required to clock out and back in for their mandatory 15 minute breaks, in the morning and afternoon.  They will not be allowed to skip breaks or to do work related activities during breaks.
  • Because all work related travel time will count against the 8 hour work day, most company meetings will be by tele- or video-conference to avoid travel.

However, not all  reps believe they deserve overtime. On cafepharma , the anonymous bulletin board for drug industry gossip, some have suggested that reps don’t work the hours they are meant to work, let alone qualify for overtime.

What’s better?  Is overtime pay worth the loss of freedom and Draconian restrictions?  As always, we’d love to hear from you.

Most Docs Not impressed by Reps Wielding iPads

While the iPad may be the hottest “must have” gadget for pharma sales reps, most doctors aren’t quite so thrilled when they are whipped out during presentations.

According to Manhattan Research while 38% of the 1,755 physicians surveyed have seen a pharma rep use an iPad or other tablet during a face-to-face meeting in the last 12 months, only 36% of physicians find the experience to be more beneficial than speaking with reps who use print materials or devices, such as laptops.

General surgeons, infectious disease or HIV physicians, anesthesiologists and OB/GYNs are the specialty groups that are most likely to agree sales reps should use iPads or other tablets for product discussions during office visits.

In contrast, rheumatologists and dermatologists are less inclined to feel that tablets are needed.

iPads are all the rage for pharma at the moment, which makes sense given the potential of these devices to support intelligent, nimble sales conversations,” says Monique Levy, VP of Manhattan Research. “Unfortunately, some of the detailing programs that are being rushed out the door are sub-par – really no better than something you’d see on tablet PCs six years ago. Doctors won’t waste their time with these.”

Despite this survey, Word on Health doesn’t expect to see reps giving up their high priced status symbol “toys” just yet. In fact, we’re pretty sure that the iPad is here to stay along with those other rep essentials – iPhone, expense account and shiny new car.

The challenge then is to create engaging medical apps and programs for the iPad.  SRxA can help companies do just that.  Contact us for more information and see how we can put the iPizzaz into the iPad!

Pharma Reps being replaced by iPads and Portals

As previously reported here, industry downsizing has resulted in the loss of over 30,000 sales positions over the past 5 years.   Now, according to a recent article in the Wall Street Journal, big pharma companies have found a way to replace many of the sales reps they’ve been laying off in recent years.  Apparently the void is being filled by digital sales tools such as websites and iPad apps. Doctors can use the tools to ask questions about drugs, order free samples and find out which insurers cover certain treatments. The changes are designed to cut costs and to reach doctors in ways other than the traditional office visit, which many busy physicians say they find intrusive and annoying. In 2009, one of every five doctors in the U.S. was what the industry calls a “no see,” meaning the doctor wouldn’t meet with reps. Just a year later that jumped to one in four.  Currently about three-quarters of industry visits to U.S. doctors’ offices fail to result in a face-to-face meeting. Throughout the 1990s and early 2000s, drug companies dramatically increased their U.S. sales forces, an escalation most companies came to regret as the economy took a downturn.  Many of those same companies are now involved in this digital shift including Sanofi-Aventis, Merck, Pfizer, GlaxoSmithKline, Novartis and Boehringer Ingelheim . Citing data from market-research firms, Eddie Williams, head of Novo Nordisk‘s biopharmaceutical business in the U.S., said 72% of U.S. doctors own a smartphone, and 95% of them use it to download medical applications. Novo Nordisk has several applications available on iTunes, including one that helps doctors calculate blood-sugar levels and another iPad/iPhone application which offers tools to help doctors diagnose bleeding disorders. Other companies such as Eli Lilly  are now considering “on-demand portals” that will allow doctors to access information instantly as they are treating patients. Although some companies have yet to be convinced of the benefits of e-marketing, most agree it is the way forward. Following the launch of Pradaxa in the U.S., Boehringer Ingelheim put together a digital-marketing package to target doctors, but found that sales calls to doctors’ offices were still the most powerful tool for driving new prescriptions, says. “No doubt digital marketing does have an impact…but I don’t believe, however, the shift happens overnight,” said Wa’el Hashad, the company’s VP of marketing. SRxA can help pharmaceutical clients with all of their digital marketing needs. Whether it’s interactive e-learning platforms, webinars, podcasts, e-newsletters, e-surveys or website design and development our fully customized, physician approved offerings will exceed your expectations. Contact us today to learn more.