Could salmon and sunshine prevent brain damage?

Brain-damageWant to keep your brain in tip-top condition? Then you may want to put mackerel and mushrooms on your menu or start eating your salmon in the sun!

That’s because a new study led by University of Kentucky researchers suggests that a diet low in vitamin D causes damage to the brain.

In addition to being essential for maintaining bone health, new evidence shows that vitamin D serves important roles in other organs and tissue, including the brain.

The study, published in Free Radical Biology and Medicine showed that middle-aged rats that were fed a diet low in vitamin D for several months developed free radical damage to the brain. Additionally, many different brain proteins were damaged.  The vitamin D deficient rats also showed a significant decrease in cognitive performance on tests of learning and memory.

“Given that vitamin D deficiency is especially widespread among the elderly, we investigated how during aging from middle-age to old-age how low vitamin D affected the oxidative status of the brain,” said lead author on the paper Allan Butterfield, professor of Chemistry, director of the Center of Membrane Sciences, faculty of Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, and director of the Free Radical Biology in Cancer Core of the Markey Cancer Center. “Adequate vitamin D serum levels are necessary to prevent free radical damage in brain and subsequent deleterious consequences.”

vitamin D bookPreviously, low levels of vitamin D have been associated with Alzheimer’s disease, and it’s also been linked to the development of certain cancers and heart disease.

The elderly are particularly prone to have low vitamin D levels.

Butterfield recommends that people consult their physicians to have their vitamin D levels determined. If they turn out to be low it’s important to normalize them either through diet or sunlight exposure to help protect the brain.

low that they eat foods rich in vitamin D, take vitamin D supplements, and/or get at least 10-15 minutes of sun exposure each day to ensure that vitamin D levels are normalized and remain so to help protect the brain.
Surprisingly few foods contain vitamin D.  That’s because your body is built to get it from sunlight skin rather than from food. However, if your body has enough, it doesn’t matter whether you got it through your skin or through your stomach.

SalmonThere are three vitamin D super foods:

  • Salmon (especially wild-caught)
  • Mackerel (especially wild-caught)
  • Mushrooms (exposed to ultraviolet light)

Other food sources of vitamin D include:

  • Cod liver oil
  • Tuna canned in water
  • Sardines canned in oil
  • Milk or yogurt – fortified with vitamin D
  • Beef or calf liver
  • Egg yolks
  • Cheese

sunlightIf all that sounds a little too fishy for you, then you can boost your vitamin D from 10-15 minutes of sun exposure a day.

I’m off to get mine now!

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10 Brain Damaging Habits

brain damageAccording to the World Health Organization here’s 10 habits that can severely damage your brain:

No Breakfast1.  No BreakfastSkipping breakfast in order to lose weight or save time is totally wrong and directly affects our brain. Those who don’t take breakfast or take unhealthy breakfast having lower blood sugar level and sometime it may cause overweight.

2. Overreacting – causes hardening of the brain arteries, leading to a decrease in mental power.

3. High Sugar consumption – Too much sugar will interrupt the absorption of proteins and nutrients causing malnutrition and may interfere with brain development by reducing the production of Brain Derived Neutrotrophic Factor, without which the brain cannot learn.

Smoking4. Smokingcauses brain shrinkage, damages memory, judgment, learning and thinking powers and may even lead to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

5. Air PollutionThe brain is the largest oxygen consumer in our body. Inhaling polluted air decreases the supply of oxygen to the brain, bringing about a decrease in brain efficiency.

6. Sleep Deprivation Sleep allows our brain to rest. Long term deprivation from sleep will accelerate the death of brain cells.

7. Head covered while sleeping – Sleeping with the head covered decreases available air space and forces you to start breathing carbon dioxide instead of oxygen. This leads to a rise in intracranial pressure and results in brain hypoxia which may lead to brain damaging effects.

8. Working your brain during illness – Working hard or studying with sickness may lead to a decrease in effectiveness of the brain. When we are sick the brain is at its weakest and becomes more easily stressed. This stress can also affect memory.

9. Drinking too little water – Water is the main source of energy and is essential for brain function and activity of neurotransmitters. Dehydration can lead to anger, stress, exhaustion, depression and lack of mental clarity.

Talking Rarely10. Rarely Talking – Intellectual conversations help to train and promote efficiency of the brain. Conversely, lack of stimulating thoughts may cause brain shrinkage. Reading SRxA’s Word on Health and discussing the content with friends is an excellent way to avoid this!  So grab a glass of water and subscribe today. Consider it free brain fuel!

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Pumped Up about Promising new Parkinson’s Pump

parkinson-disease60Parkinson’s disease, as many of our readers know is a chronic, progressive neurological disease that causes sufferers to lose control of body movements, resulting in tremors, muscle stiffness, loss of balance and a host of other problems. Currently, there is no cure for Parkinson’s disease and treatment options are limited. Therapy is directed at treating the symptoms that are most bothersome and for this reason, there is no standard or “best” treatment for that applies to every patient.

Treatment approaches include medications and surgery (deep brain stimulation) as well as general lifestyle modifications (rest and exercise), physical, occupational and speech therapy.

levodopaAmong the drug-related therapies, levodopa is considered one of the most effective for relieving the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. It helps reduce tremor, stiffness, and slowness and helps improve muscle control, balance, and walking. Levodopa does not slow the disease process, but it improves muscle movement and delays severe disability. So far, levodopa, which had been used to treat Parkinson’s since the 1970’s, has only been available in pill form.

But a new Cleveland Clinic study finds that using a pump to administer a gel form of levodopa directly into the small intestine is much more effective.

Neurologist Hubert Fernandez, MD, who led the study, says, “The levodopa pump decreased or improved what we call the ‘bad time’ in Parkinson’s patients by up to four hours per day.” The levodopa can control this ‘bad time’ — the tremors, muscle spasms and other movement disorders that makes it difficult for Parkinson’s patients to function on a daily basis.

parkinsons-gel-drug-pump-190x155This is an amazing finding,” says Fernandez. “We know of no other oral therapy that will improve the bad time in Parkinson’s by an average of four hours daily.”

The levodopa pump is external. It sits in a pouch under the patient’s shirt and provides a steady dose of the drug. The levodopa gel is administered directly into the small intestine, where most of the drug is absorbed. The constant dose makes the body’s movements more controlled and predictable, making it easier for people with the disease to plan and go about their day without worrying that the drug’s effects will wear off.

The biggest advantage of the levodopa is its efficacy,” Dr. Fernandez says. “We’re trying to deliver it on a continuous basis so the patients don’t need to take it every hour.” parkinsons gel pump

69-year-old Bob Van Housen has been living with Parkinson’s disease for over 12 years.  Prior to enrollment in the study he was having to take up to five levodopa pills every three hours to control his symptoms. Even then, his symptoms progressed to the point where it was hard to keep up.  “He was ‘off’ for at least seven hours,” said Van Housen’s wife, Carol. “Seven hours is a long time to not be able to function every day.”

The couple often had to cut their trips together short and limit their social outings outside of the house. Van Housen says that being part of the trial at Cleveland Clinic has been life-changing. “We can predict better how I’m going to feel and how I’m going to act and can plan trips and work around those times when I otherwise would have been problematic.”

The gel pump which is not yet available in the United States is currently under review by the Food and Drug Administration. Let’s hope it doesn’t hit any hurdles along the way, so others with Parkinson’s can avoid the roller-coaster of symptoms and enjoy the type of benefits that Bob has experienced.

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