Pharma Under Fire for Fair Balance Failings

Unfair balanceUh oh! Seems like the Pharma industry is in trouble again.

Research published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine suggests that family physicians receive “little or no information” about adverse effects associated with medicines in the majority of drug promotions made by sales representatives.

In the study, 255 family doctors from urban practices in the US [Sacrameto], France [Tolouse] and Canada [Montreal and Vancouver] answered questionnaires following visits from sales representatives.  The primary outcome measure was “minimally adequate safety information” (mention of at least one indication, serious adverse event, common adverse event, and contraindication, and no unqualified safety claims or unapproved indications).

The findings showed that sales representatives did not provide any information about common or serious side effects, or identify the patients who should not be using the drug, in 59% of the promotions. In Canada, no potential side effects were mentioned for 66% of promoted products, according to the results.

yes no riskThe researchers also indicated that although 57% of the promoted drugs carried boxed warnings from the FDA or Health Canada, serious adverse events were only discussed in about 6% of the sales pitches.

Félicitations to the French reps who provided information on harm for 61% of the promotions, compared to only 34% in Canada and 39% in the US.

Despite this lack of “fair balance” overall, the doctors considered the quality of the scientific information to be good or excellent for 54% of the promotions and indicated that they would be willing to prescribe the drugs 64% of the time.

Laws in all three countries require sales representatives to provide information on harm as well as benefits,” says lead author Barbara Mintzes, Assistant Professor at the University of British Colombia. “But no one is monitoring these visits and there are next to no sanctions for misleading or inaccurate promotion.”

Despite widespread belief by physicians to the contrary, the information provided by pharmaceutical sales representatives has been shown to influence prescribing. Greater exposure to promotion is associated with higher prescribing volume and costs.  And while regulations in all three countries require sales representatives to provide information on the risks as well as the benefits of their drugs, there are differences.  It’s interesting, to correlate the above results with the fact that that France has the strictest information standards, whereas Canada relies on industry self-regulation.

However, across all three countries, the results of this study would appear to question if current approaches are adequate to protect patient health.

The Pharma Industry should take note.  Time to clean up your act before the Government and Regulatory Authorities do it for you.

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One thought on “Pharma Under Fire for Fair Balance Failings

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