We’d Like to Bounce Something Off You…

In 1945, George Nissen, a competitive gymnast, patented the modern trampoline as a “tumbling device. Initially intended as a training tool for acrobats and gymnasts it was subsequently used for military aviator training.

More recently, at least if my neighborhood backyards are anything to go by, the main use of trampolines, is recreational. Driven perhaps, by parents concerns that their kids are becoming more sedentary, along with a family-friendly price tag, it seems there are few family gardens in suburban Northern America that don’t have a trampoline

All this despite the fact that the American Academy of Pediatrics and other lofty medical organizations such as the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, the Canadian Pediatric Society and the Canadian Academy of Sports Medicine have issued guidelines discouraging the use of trampolines in homes and playgrounds..

In fact, with each new set of guidelines comes an increase in the numbers of trampolines in the home setting.

And an increase in injuries…

In 2009, the rate of trampoline-associated injuries was 160 per 100,000 among 5-14 year olds. And approximately 75% of these injuries occurred when more than one person was on the trampoline at the same time.

The most common site of trampoline injury, is the lower leg accounting for 34% – 50% of injuries and >60% involved the ankle,  Upper extremities are injured in 24% – 36% of cases. Most commonly, when people fall off the trampoline. Of these, approximately 60% are fractures.

Head and Neck Injuries account for 10% to 17% of all trampoline-related injuries and 0.5% of these, result in permanent neurologic damage.

And before, you succumb to your precious little angel’s demands, or are tempted by fall yard sale trampoline bargains you may also want to consider the following:

  • The potential for severe and devastating injury is high.
  • Enclosures and padding may provide a false sense of security and do not prevent the large numbers of injuries that occur on the trampoline mat itself.
  • Many injuries occur even with reported adult supervision.
  • Multiple jumpers increase injury risk, particularly to the smallest participants; so trampoline use should be restricted to a single jumper at any given time
  • Individuals 5 years and younger appear to be at increased risk of fractures and dislocations from trampoline-related injuries.
  • Somersaulting, flipping, and falls put jumpers at increased risk of head and cervical spine injury with potentially permanent and devastating consequences. These maneuvers should not be performed in the recreational setting.
  • Active supervision by adults familiar with the above recommendations should occur at all times. Mere presence of an adult is not sufficient.

Have you got a trampoline story to tell? SRxA’s Word on Health is looking forward to hearing from you.

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