Botox, Brotox & Bladders

When someone mentions Botox injections, you probably think of Hollywood actresses with too perfect faces or wealthy housewives desperately trying to turn back time. Yes, we know it’s becoming more main stream, so maybe you’re also thinking about your own appointment for “shots” or maybe even “BroTox”. What we’re pretty sure you’re not thinking about is – incontinence. However, that’s exactly its newest use. Recently, the FDA approved using the injections to help patients with neurological conditions (such as multiple sclerosis or spinal cord injury) who suffer from either incontinence, or an overactive bladder. Neurologic conditions can cause miscommunication between the bladder and the brain.  As a result, the bladder muscle can become overactive, increasing the pressure in the bladder and decreasing the volume of urine the bladder can hold. This can lead to frequent, unexpected urine leakage, or urinary incontinence. Botox works by paralyzing bladder muscles, thus preventing the contractions that cause urgency or leakage. Although medications and behavioral modifications are treatment options, many patients, especially the elderly, do not respond to these methods and need a more aggressive approach. “About 80 percent of patients with neurological conditions, such as spinal cord injuries, Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis, see improvement after about a week, and the results can last four to nine months,” says Charles Nager, MD, co-director of the UC San Diego Women’s Pelvic Medicine Center at UC San Diego Health System. Incontinence is the seventh condition, including chronic migraines, upper limb spasticity and underarm sweating, that Botox has been approved to treat since it first arrived on the market in 2002. The outpatient procedure uses a local numbing gel, followed by 15 -20 injections in different areas of the bladder muscle. “It can really be life changing for someone with severe incontinence issues,” said Nager. Want to share your Botox stories with SRxA’s Word on Health?  We’d love to hear from you.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s