Springing Forward Safely

SRxA’s Word on Health reminds you to turns your clocks forward an hour before going to bed tomorrow night. But as your dream of that extra hour of daylight, remember all good things come with a price.  First, the switch to summer time means we all lose an hours’ sleep. More worryingly, the time change may be bad for your health.

According to experts at the University of Alabama in the days immediately following the time change your risk of having a heart attack goes up by about 10%.

Because the Sunday morning of the time change doesn’t require an abrupt schedule change for most people, the elevated risk doesn’t kick in until Monday when people rise earlier to go to work.

Interestingly, the opposite happens in the fall, when we turn the clocks back. Then, the risk of heart attacks drops by 10%.

Exactly why this happens is not known but there are several theories,” says Associate Professor Martin Young, Ph.D. from the University of Alabama’s Division of Cardiovascular Disease.  “Sleep deprivation, the body’s circadian clock and immune responses all can come into play when considering reasons that changing the time by an hour can be detrimental to someone’s health.”

Young offers several possible explanations:

Individuals who are sleep-deprived weigh more and are at an increased risk of developing diabetes or heart disease. Sleep deprivation also can alter other body processes, including inflammatory response, which can contribute to a heart attack. Apparently, your reaction to sleep deprivation and the time change also depends on whether you are a morning person or night owl. Night owls have a much more difficult time with springing forward.

Circadian clock – every cell in the body has its own clock that allows it to anticipate when something is going to happen and prepare for it. When there is a shift, such as springing forward, it takes a while for the cells to readjust. It’s comparable to knowing that you have a meeting at 2 p.m. and having time to prepare your presentation instead of being told at the last minute and not being able to prepare.

Immune function – immune cells have a clock, and the immune response depends greatly on the time of day. In animal studies, when a mouse is given a sub-lethal dose of an endotoxin that elicits a strong immune response, survival depends upon the time of day they were given this endotoxin. Mice that were put through a phased advance much like Daylight Savings Time, and then had a challenge to their immune system, died, whereas the control animals that were not subjected to a phased advance survive when given the same dose of the toxin.

Fortunately, the body’s clock eventually synchs to the new time on its own.  In the meantime we offer you some tips to help you ease your body into the adjustment.

  • Wake up 30 minutes earlier on Saturday and Sunday than you need to in preparation for the early start on Monday
  • Eat a decent-sized breakfast
  • Go outside in the sunlight in the early morning
  • Exercise in the mornings over the weekend

These tricks will help reset both the master, clock in the brain that reacts to changes in light/dark cycles, and the peripheral clocks — the ones everywhere else including the one in the heart — that react to food intake and physical activity, thereby reducing the chance of a heart attack on Monday.

Assuming we all survive the annual time change shock to our system, we look forward to seeing you back here after the weekend.

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