Sweet Protection Against Parkinson’s Disease

New research shows men and women who regularly eat berries may have a lower risk of developing Parkinson’s disease.  Men may further lower their risk by regularly eating apples, oranges and other sources rich in dietary flavonoids.

The study which was supported by the National Institutes of Health involved 49,281 men and 80,336 women. Researchers gave participants questionnaires and used a database to calculate intake amount of flavonoids. They then analyzed the association between flavonoid intakes and risk of developing Parkinson’s disease. They also analyzed consumption of five major sources of foods rich in flavonoids: tea, berries, apples, red wine and oranges or orange juice. The participants were followed for 20 to 22 years.

During that time, 805 people developed Parkinson’s disease. In men, the top 20% who consumed the most flavonoids were about 40% less likely to develop Parkinson’s disease than the bottom 20% of male participants who consumed the least amount of flavonoids.

In women, there was no relationship between overall flavonoid consumption and developing Parkinson’s disease. However, when sub-classes of flavonoids were examined, regular consumption of anthocyanins, which are mainly obtained from berries, were found to be associated with a lower risk of Parkinson’s disease in both men and women.

This is the first study in humans to examine the association between flavonoids and risk of developing Parkinson’s disease,” said study author Xiang Gao, MD, PhD, with the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston.

Fruit consumption has also been related to health benefits in a whole range of conditions including cancer, stroke, heart disease, diverticulosis, hypertension, cataracts, diabetes, asthma, and bronchitis.

Do you have any fruity stories to share?  SRxA’s Word on Health would love to hear from you.

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One thought on “Sweet Protection Against Parkinson’s Disease

  1. Pingback: Getting Cheery Over Cherries! | SRxA's Word on Health

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